“It’s not our fault, those nasty GPs made us do it!”

“Morning, how are you? So you’re struggling with your knee? Ok, let’s take a look, pop up on the couch.

Right, what I suggest for the time being is some anti-inflammatories and gentle exercise. It’s better to avoid those drill wielding hospital doctors for as long as possible. It’s a bit of a slippery slope once you embark on the surgical route. Let’s see if time and patience will do the trick.

Hello again, no better? Physiotherapy for you then I think. They can work wonders.

Still no better? Righto, let’s get an X-ray sorted and we’ll get you off to the orthopaedic guys, to see if they can help. There are a number of possibilities and treatment options depending on X-ray and scan results, let’s see what they say.”

So, this is option one. This is what goes on in every GP surgery, every week of the year, but let’s take a look at the parallel universe of the British Orthopaedic Association.

“Morning, how are you? So you’re struggling with your knee? Ok, let’s get an MRI and ask the orthopaedic surgeons to see you.

REALLY??? Are you serious?

General Practice and Practitioners are becoming inured to the constant barrage of abuse and approbation from politicians and the media, but there is a particularly offensive sting to ill-considered criticism from colleagues, who frankly should know better than to throw stones in their secondary care glasshouses.

http://www.boa.ac.uk/latest-news/boabask-response-to-media-reports-regarding-knee-arthroscopy/

The phrase, “…….if GPs are doing their job properly….” has a wonderfully arrogant and patronising ring to it don’t you think? And as for, “………performance of this investigation (MRI) replaces the traditional medical skills of history taking and physical examination of the patient…”, well frankly, words fail me.

General Practice effectively manages the vast proportion of clinical presentations without the need to refer to secondary care. Those that are referred are done because further management is beyond the clinical expertise of the referrer, hence transition to the supposed ‘specialist’.

But it appears not. Orthopaedic surgeons are apparently incapable of utilising “the traditional medical skills of history taking and physical examination of the patient”. Nor are they able to deal effectively with patient expectation. No, instead it appears it’s the GPs fault for not managing the patients properly in the first place.

If we listen carefully outside the orthopaedic clinics, we will hear the bleating cries of the poor little lambs, “we didn’t want to do an arthroscopy, those nasty GPs made us do it.”